News

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  • The Stephenville Theatre Festival kicks off on July 15th, wraps up on August 14th, and brings a brand new set of shows that are sure to leave audiences engaged and entertained. We’re bringing in some of the best talent in Canada, so it’s sure to be a good time!

  • Enjoy a parade, live music, plenty of food, and endless fun. Running from July 25th to July 31st, the Fish, Fun and Folk Festival is something you won’t want to miss. Check out the link for more details.

  • If you find yourself near Gros Morne National Park over the next couple of weeks, or if you’re simply in need of some creative inspiration, be sure to check out the Trails, Tales and Tunes Festival, May 14th to 28th.

  • Forget about cod. Newfoundland’s remote Fogo Island is laying the foundation to become an international design and art destination.

  • Here in NL, we're proud to lay claim to a deep storytelling culture, and on Tuesday, the St. John's Storytelling Festival officially kicked off. The festival is running for 8 days, so you still have time to hear (and maybe tell) a few tales.

  • Fogo Island's incredible Long Studio has been short listed for Building of the Year by ArchDaily.com, the most visited architecture website in the world. This is huge, and the Long Studio needs even more votes to take the big prize, so follow the link on the next page and help put Fogo, NL and Canada on the map. You never know, you might win too. There's an iPad up for grabs for voters!

  • Let's hear it for our own The Once and Amelia Curran, who swept up some sweet wins at the Canadian Folk Music Awards over the weekend! Geraldine Hollett, Phil Churchill and Andrew Dale of The Once won in both the traditional album and new/emerging artist of the year categories. Juno-awarded Amelia Curran won solo artist of the year.

  • With a new year comes new Tourism TV! Watch ‘Half Hour’ and ‘500 Years,’ the latest chapters in the continuing Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism story. In Half Hour, we look at the unique half an hour time difference here in NL. In 500 Years, we celebrate the spirit of our capital city, St. John’s, which is one of the oldest in North America, but one of the youngest at heart.

  • Dark humour is the silver lining of Newfoundland and Labrador’s colonial history. Those early European settlers were the original survivors. Pirates, unpredictable weather, buccaneers disguised as governors, hard labour, wars, privation - all easy targets for the wits and wags who laughed and struggled onward through the fog of mercantile exploitation and inept colonial administration. Laughing in the face of danger may seem unseemly, but when the alternative is tears, you might as well laugh. And that’s been our motto ever since.

    That tradition lives on in the narrow lanes of Trinity, Trinity Bay, where each summer actors with Rising Tide Theatre take history to the people with the New Founde Lande Trinity Pageant, the anchor event of the Seasons in the Bight Festival.

  • With over 130 root cellars – small storage spaces skillfully built into the hillsides – Elliston has an unusual heritage. Important to many in rural Newfoundland, the root cellars kept vegetables cool, yet frost- free and edible during the long winter months.

    It’s late October, 1887. The few meagre crops eked out during the short summer months are in and the frost is quickly coming. God help the family that doesn’t have a proper root cellar!

    - Anonymous Bird Island Cove Resident (now Elliston).

    As remote as Newfoundland and Labrador probably seemed to some back in the 1800s, invention and know-how were definitely up to snuff!

  • Rugged, wild and beautiful, the coastal communities of Brigus and Cupids will take you back in time. Rich in culture and history, the two towns are just a stone’s throw from one another, and both are located just an hour outside of St. John’s. Let the townspeople take you in as you explore heritage that has been preserved for hundreds of years. And see for yourself what we’ve been celebrating. 

    Of all the mariners who set to sea in Newfoundland and Labrador over the centuries, none is more justly famous than Captain Bob Bartlett of Brigus. A noted explorer in his own right, and perhaps the greatest ice pilot who ever lived, Bartlett guided American Commodore Robert Peary to within 150 miles of the North Pole in 1909, at which point Peary set out with one servant to finish the job on foot. Bartlett won numerous awards and spent many summers exploring the Arctic, and had a gift for self-promotion that in the first half of the 20th century made him one of the most famous men alive.

  • Newfoundland and Labrador isn't your typical run-of-the-mill tourism destination. It's complex, ancient and multi-faceted. Nowhere is this fact more apparent than within Canada's 'exquisite jewel,' Torngat Mountains National Park. Read about one Toronto Sun reporter's unique experience. There's video too...

  • St. John’s Time

    10 Jan 2011

    St. John’s Time is an 11-day festival taking in the Royal St. John’s Regatta, the George Street Festival, the St. John’s Downtown Buskers Festival and the Newfoundland and Labrador Folk Festival. The festival starts in late July and goes until early August.

    Thousands descend on George Street every year to take in the annual George Street Festival - one of the biggest and friendliest patio parties in the world. This event always precedes the Royal St. John’s Regatta. The Royal St. John’s Regatta is a 1-day event and is the oldest, longest running sporting event in North America! This 1-day festival draws in the vicinity of 60,000 people to Quidi Vidi Lake in the heart of St. John’s to watch the races and to try their luck on various ticket spins, or just sit back and relax and take in the sights. This event is always the first Wednesday in August.

  • This Vancouver Sun article talks about a recently discovered cemetery in Cupids, NL, which is thought to be the oldest English burial ground in Canada. We also happen to have the oldest burial site in all of North America, located at L'Anse Amour, Labrador. It dates back 7,500 years — 3,000 years before the pyramids of Egypt.

  • CNN’s travel reporter has been charmed by our “Viking history, stunning rocky landscapes and warm, welcoming locals.” Read all about her experience exploring remote, wild and beautiful, Newfoundland and Labrador.

  • “It was the gun that helped England secure its first foothold in the future Canada four centuries ago…” A 400-year-old archeological find in North America's oldest colony, Cupids, NL, has got historians excited. Check out this Vancouver Sun article about discovering the 17th-century remains of the actual cannon site that helped England secure its first claim within what would become Canada.

  • Fogo Island, already rich in culture and history, is in the middle of a creative evolution. This article in design magazine Azure features a dramatic feat of architecture that will have artists clamouring to tap into their Fogo muse.

  • "Hooked. On architecture. That’s what you’ll be feeling after the Fogo Island Arts colony is done with you." An article about the astonishingly creative architecture of the new Fogo Island resort and artist in residency development.

  • The love keeps pouring in for St. John's and NL. This travel feature appeared in Britain's widely read Daily Mail newspaper. It highlights some of the similarities between Newfoundlanders and their friends across the pond... most notably, an affinity for the longest running TV soap in the world...

  • Not that we ever stopped 'rockin,' but this Globe and Mail feature talks about something St. John's residents have known for a long time: our city is cutting edge when it comes to music, art, fashion, dining out and even doing business. St. John's rocks and it's the place to be!