News

37
  • Coinciding with its 40th anniversary in the town of Grand Bank, the Provincial Seaman’s Museum has re-opened after expanding their exhibition size. After nearly losing the museum to a fire, the old is new again.

  • A dramatic community project is transforming a windswept island of fishermen off Canada's Newfoundland coast into a cutting edge artists' haven

  • A new exhibit opened in St. John's today to show us what St. John's was like back in the day.

  • With a new year comes new Tourism TV! Watch ‘Half Hour’ and ‘500 Years,’ the latest chapters in the continuing Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism story. In Half Hour, we look at the unique half an hour time difference here in NL. In 500 Years, we celebrate the spirit of our capital city, St. John’s, which is one of the oldest in North America, but one of the youngest at heart.

  • With over 130 root cellars – small storage spaces skillfully built into the hillsides – Elliston has an unusual heritage. Important to many in rural Newfoundland, the root cellars kept vegetables cool, yet frost- free and edible during the long winter months.

    It’s late October, 1887. The few meagre crops eked out during the short summer months are in and the frost is quickly coming. God help the family that doesn’t have a proper root cellar!

    - Anonymous Bird Island Cove Resident (now Elliston).

    As remote as Newfoundland and Labrador probably seemed to some back in the 1800s, invention and know-how were definitely up to snuff!

  • Rugged, wild and beautiful, the coastal communities of Brigus and Cupids will take you back in time. Rich in culture and history, the two towns are just a stone’s throw from one another, and both are located just an hour outside of St. John’s. Let the townspeople take you in as you explore heritage that has been preserved for hundreds of years. And see for yourself what we’ve been celebrating. 

    Of all the mariners who set to sea in Newfoundland and Labrador over the centuries, none is more justly famous than Captain Bob Bartlett of Brigus. A noted explorer in his own right, and perhaps the greatest ice pilot who ever lived, Bartlett guided American Commodore Robert Peary to within 150 miles of the North Pole in 1909, at which point Peary set out with one servant to finish the job on foot. Bartlett won numerous awards and spent many summers exploring the Arctic, and had a gift for self-promotion that in the first half of the 20th century made him one of the most famous men alive.

  • Newfoundland and Labrador isn't your typical run-of-the-mill tourism destination. It's complex, ancient and multi-faceted. Nowhere is this fact more apparent than within Canada's 'exquisite jewel,' Torngat Mountains National Park. Read about one Toronto Sun reporter's unique experience. There's video too...

  • Located at the most easterly point of land in North America, Cape Spear is where you can see nature at its most beautiful and wild; tranquil and ferocious; it all depends on the day you visit. The site is surrounded by spectacular scenery and wildlife such as whales, seabirds and icebergs in season.

    In 1834, construction began on the first lighthouse, with a foghorn added in 1878. The light was first lit by oil, with acetylene adopted in 1916, and electricity in 1930. In 1955, the dipodic system was moved to a new light tower, not far from the original lighthouse. The original lighthouse is the oldest surviving lighthouse in Newfoundland with the original building and the lightkeeper’s residence restored to the period of 1939, and shows how a lightkeeper and his family might have lived there during that time.

  • Mistaken mystique

    21 Nov 2010

    Mistaken Point is a remarkable place. A beautiful, rocky headland at the tip of the Avalon Peninsula bearing the fossilized remnants of ancient creatures more than half a billion years old. Etched onto two shelves of stone, these cryptic messages from the distant past were once primitive animals living at the bottom of the ocean. The volcanic ash that killed them, also preserved them

  • This Vancouver Sun article talks about a recently discovered cemetery in Cupids, NL, which is thought to be the oldest English burial ground in Canada. We also happen to have the oldest burial site in all of North America, located at L'Anse Amour, Labrador. It dates back 7,500 years — 3,000 years before the pyramids of Egypt.

  • Is the greatest pirate of all time from NL? Newfoundland and Labrador's infamous pirate, Peter Easton, who plundered foreign ships sailing the Atlantic Ocean in the early 17th century, may well be the most notorious pirate of all time. CTV's W5 went diving for evidence off the coast of Conception Bay, NL.

  • “It was the gun that helped England secure its first foothold in the future Canada four centuries ago…” A 400-year-old archeological find in North America's oldest colony, Cupids, NL, has got historians excited. Check out this Vancouver Sun article about discovering the 17th-century remains of the actual cannon site that helped England secure its first claim within what would become Canada.

  • This feature in WestJet's Up! magazine whimsically explores the charming and scenic fishing village, Quidi Vidi, which flanks the base of Signal Hill, just a five-minute drive away from downtown St. John's... "The village is a little sheltered corner of the east coast, with a glimpse of the Atlantic Ocean from inside the gut..."

  • The Land of Spirits: This Globe and Mail feature is all about Canada’s newest national park — Torngat Mountains National Park in Labrador. From polar bear sightings to ice bergs, all seen within one of the last untouched wilderness areas in the world, the experience was clearly an unforgettable one for the writer.

  • Number 3! Newfoundland and Labrador was named one of the 7 Hottest Summer Destinations of 2010 by TripAtlas.com. "Polar bears, icebergs, maritime culture, Viking history, and Cupids ... there's no place more enlightening than Newfoundland & Labrador this summer."

  • Walkable St. John’s. Westjet’s Up! magazine has ranked St John’s, NL as one of the Top Ten Most Walkable Cities in Canada thanks to its historic streets, winding staircases and brightly coloured buildings. Not to mention a great trail system.

  • “Newfoundland and Labrador may lie in the Atlantic a time zone ahead of the rest of North America, but visiting Canada's easternmost province is like taking a step back in time…” Read about the province’s Viking heritage in this NY Daily News article.